Hurricane Florence: High Winds & Falling Trees Kill 2 in North Carolina

Hurricane Florence: High Winds & Falling Trees Kill 2 in North Carolina

 City of New Bern, N.C. Police Department posted this photo of its downtown after Florence struck. Officials said, “there is flooding, standing water, and debris in the area be mindful of first responders assisting citizens. Please remain off of roadways. There is a 24-hour curfew in place that will expire Sept. 15, 2018.” New Bern P.D. City of New Bern, N.C. Police Department posted this photo of its downtown after Florence struck. Officials said, “there is flooding, standing water, and debris in the area be mindful of first responders assisting citizens. Please remain off of roadways. There is a 24-hour curfew in place that will expire Sept. 15, 2018.”

The National Weather Service reported Friday morning that, “a life-threatening storm surge is already occurring along portions of the North Carolina coast and will continue through today and tonight. This surge is also likely along portions of the South Carolina coast.”

NWS said the greatest storm surge inundation was expected between Cape Fear and Cape Hatteras, including the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers and western Pamlico Sound. Meanwhile, “life-threatening, catastrophic flash flooding and prolonged significant river flooding” were expected for portions of the Carolinas and the southern and central Appalachians through Monday and Tuesday, as the storm was expected to slow as it moves inland.

By Friday afternoon, the first two fatalities were announced by Wilmington, North Carolina police, who confirmed the the storm's first two fatalities of Hurricane Florence. They said a “mother and infant were killed when a tree fell on their house.” Also, the father was transported to a hospital with injuries.

Meanwhile, 485,143 people lost power in North Carolina because of Florence, said the North Carolina Department of Safety.

On Friday, Kepler51 Analytics said, “Hurricane Florence is already resulting in a complete transportation shutdown along the Carolina coastlines today, with heavy delays being observed further inland as the storm continues to move slowly westward. Road conditions along the Carolina coastlines are currently impassable due to heavy winds, coastal flooding, and torrential rainfall, with these conditions expected to continue throughout the day and likely into early Saturday. Transportation directly along the coastline is likely to remain nearly impossible through at least the end of the weekend due to ongoing rainfall-related flooding, with a high probability of these difficult conditions extending into the early portion of next week.”

Hurricane level winds hit

Especially worrisome for the NWS is that “damaging hurricane-force winds are occurring along portions of the North Carolina coast and are expected to spread to portions of the South Carolina coast later today. Strong winds could also spread inland into portions of the Carolinas over the next couple of days.”

In particular, “Damaging hurricane-force winds are occurring along portions of the North Carolina coast and are expected to spread to portions of the South Carolina coast later today. Strong winds could also spread inland into portions of the Carolinas over the next couple of days.”

In addition, wind gusts of 72-75 mph were reported in North Carolina along the coast.

Earlier in the week, school buses were used to evacuate residents of Jacksonville, N.C., and were picked up at the Jacksonville Commons Middle School, it was announced.

The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk reported on Sept. 12 that Kai Armstrong, the supervisor of transportation services for Norfolk Public Schools, dispatched over 30 buses to move residents to city shelters, which were at: Crossroads Elementary, Southside STEM Academy and Norview High School. Afterwards, the buses were relocated to high ground, to avoid any flooding.Reporter Sara Gregory wrote that, “At the district’s other schools, storm kits were sent out. Building supervisors and custodial staff ran through checklists to make sure buildings were prepared.”

Reporter Sara Gregory wrote that, “At the district’s other schools, storm kits were sent out. Building supervisors and custodial staff ran through checklists to make sure buildings were prepared.”

Review of What has Happened So Far

Florence is expected to damage or wreck “thousands of vehicles from high winds and flooding, according to a Cox Automotive report published Sept. 11. If the Category 4 storm maintains its current path, Cox Automotive said North Carolina could lose 20,000 to 40,000 vehicles,” wrote Matthew Rocco at FOXBusiness on Wednesday.

The National Hurricane Center stressed Wednesday that, “Florence is still forecast to be an extremely dangerous major hurricane when it nears the U.S. coast on Friday.”

bern downtown floodedThe City of New Bern, N.C. Police Department posted this photo of its flooded downtown after Florence struck.

FEMA press conference 091318
FEMA Administrator Brock Long and federal partners provide an update on Hurricane Florence, Sept. 13.

florence 091418Satellite image taken earlier today, Sept. 14 that shows the likely path of the storm center, but does not show the size of the storm. NWS cautions that, “hazardous conditions can occur outside of the cone.”

florence rainfall 091418

On Friday, the darkest purple represents the heaviest predicted rainfall is 20 inches of rain for North Carolina over the coming 5-day period, in this satellite image shot at 5:07 a.m. EDT, Sept. 14.

101st Airborne planning sessionA 101st Airborne planning session for Hurricane Florence. (Photos by: Staff Sgt. Joshua Tucker.)

 

Other Hurricane Activities

Over in the Pacific Ocean, “Heavy rain and strong winds from Olivia could produce landslides and flash flooding in areas of Hawaii that are usually drier. A Gulf system is expected to produce heavy rain in Texas. Issac is being monitored for potential threats to U.S. territories.”

Lists of schools & district closings that are updated daily

HHS Sec. AzurEarlier this week, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azur declared health emergencies in several states. “Approximately 300 ambulances are standing ready to assist with patient care, transport and evacuation,” he said. “Two 250-bed federal medical stations are staged to support care for displaced people with special health needs, including those with chronic health conditions, limited mobility, or common mental health issues.”

Last modified onTuesday, 18 September 2018 09:23