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Thomas Built Buses Recognized as “Steward of the Year” by N.C. Department of Environmental Quality

HIGH POINT, N.C. – Thomas Built Buses (TBB), a leading manufacturer of school buses in North America, has been honored as “Steward of the Year” at the annual Environmental Stewardship Initiative (ESI) Conference hosted by the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), where members were recognized for their commitment to environmental excellence.

ESI is a non-regulatory program established in 2002 with the goal of promoting superior environmental performance by North Carolina organizations. This initiative encourages the development and implementation of pollution prevention programs and innovative approaches to exceed regulatory requirements. Over the past two decades, ESI members have collectively reduced water usage by over 15.4 billion gallons and waste sent to landfills by 4.2 million tons. Since the inception of the program, ESI members have reported a total financial savings (based on environmental reductions) exceeding $102.8 million.

ESI currently has 102 members across the state, and consists of three levels: Partners, Rising Stewards, and Stewards, the highest level of achievement. This year, the program is made up of 30 Stewards, 10 Rising Stewards, and 62 Partners. Thomas Built Buses has proudly been a member since 2011.

“At Thomas Built Buses, we are committed to environmental excellence,” said Scott Fister, Thomas Built’s environmental engineering supervisor. “This commitment extends beyond the creation of clean drive technologies to sustainable manufacturing practices, waste reduction and material reuse. As the first school bus manufacturer to achieve zero-waste-to-landfill operations and a longtime member of the Environmental Stewardship Initiative, we are honored by the recognition.”

“All the facilities involved in the state’s Environmental Stewardship Initiative have committed to going above and beyond to protect our natural resources,” said DEQ Secretary Elizabeth S. Biser. “Their efforts benefit both our environment and our economy.”

A proud subsidiary of Daimler Truck North America (DTNA), Thomas Built Buses is part of a global commitment to sustainable efforts, with goals to reduce volatile organic compounds, energy consumption, waste generation, and water consumption. The company also aims for CO2-neutral new vehicle production by 2025.

For more information about ESI, visit, www.ncesi.org. To learn more about Thomas Built Buses’ sustainability practices, visit https://thomasbuiltbuses.com/about-us/.

About Thomas Built Buses:
Founded in 1916, Thomas Built Buses is a leading manufacturer of school buses in North America. Since the first Thomas Built bus rolled off the assembly line, the company has been committed to delivering the smartest and most innovative buses in North America. Learn more at https://thomasbuiltbuses.com or at https://www.facebook.com/thomasbuiltbuses.

Thomas Built Buses, Inc., headquartered in High Point, N.C., is a subsidiary of Daimler Truck North America LLC, a leading provider of comprehensive products and technologies for the commercial transportation industry. The company designs, engineers, manufactures and markets medium- and heavy-duty trucks, school buses, vehicle chassis and their associated technologies and components under the Freightliner, Western Star, Thomas Built Buses, Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp and Detroit brands. Daimler Truck North America is a subsidiary of Daimler Truck, one of the world’s leading commercial vehicle manufacturers.

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